Opal Moonbaby Blog Tour: Fantasy Writer? Moi?

For Words on Wednesday this week, we have a real treat. Maudie Smith, author of the fabulous Opal Moonbaby (see my review) is stopping off on her blog tour to talk about genre.

Fantasy Writer? Moi?
If you’d asked me a couple of years ago whether I liked fantasy writing I’d probably have said no immediately. There would have been no need for soul-searching. As an adult I don’t tend to pick up fantasy literature. I’ve never read a Terry Pratchett for example (don’t know what I’m missing?) and the term ‘sci-fi’ has always been something of a turn off. Sci-fi’s not for me, I’d say. It’s more of a boy thing.

So when I started writing OPAL MOONBABY and it turned out to be about an alien from another planet, that was something of a surprise, even to me. I’ve always thought I liked my literature to be set firmly in the real world. But I now realise that I only have to scratch the surface of my childhood reading to see that this never used to be the case.

We’re all plunged into fantasy as soon as we start listening to stories. Fairy tales, myths and legends are full of fantastic worlds and amazing creatures the like of which we will never see on Earth. These strange environments and weird and wonderful creatures fire our imaginations and make us laugh but they do more than that too.

When we are children the adult world seems a mad and complicated place. Fairy tales help us make some sense of it but our need to do so doesn’t just end when we grow out of Hansel and Gretel, Cinderella and The Pied Piper. We’re always having to try and make sense of the world we inhabit. I think that’s why I loved books where real world characters bumped into fantasy ones, each having to figure out the logic behind the other’s world.

It’s that moment where fantasy and reality collide that gets me going. The moment when Mary Poppins flutters down to London with a roomful of belongings in her carpet bag. The moment when Tommy and Annika discover their new neighbour, Pippi Longstocking, has superhuman strength and can lift her horse with one hand. It’s the wardrobe moment when Lucy pushes her way past all the coats and finds herself in Narnia and comes face to face with Mr Tumnus.

I loved THE HOBBIT but I wasn’t such a fantasy addict that I wanted to tackle THE LORD OF THE RINGS. I liked books where there was more of my world involved, where I could identify with the main characters and their problems. Narnia was enthralling but I was always keen to hang around quite near the entrance to the wardrobe.

In my book Opal is the title character and she’s the catalyst for the story but the real hero is Martha. I wanted my human hero to be as rooted as possible in the everyday world and it was her story I wanted to write. Martha has everyday problems with friendships and family, of the type we can all identify with, and she has to solve them herself. Sometimes Opal is helpful and sometimes she makes things more difficult than ever but I hope she always adds spice and sparkle, and some humour, to any adventure.

Opal isn’t the only fantasy character I’m working on just now. Reluctant witches, elusive mermaids and jealous cloud creatures are all milling around up there in my brain cogs. So I suppose I must be a fantasy writer after all.

Maybe I’d better sample some more adult fantasy then. Stephen King, here I come….?

Thanks for such an interesting post, Maudie. I must admit, I tend not to read much ‘pure’ fantasy written for adults either. I love Pratchett , but don’t see his books as ‘pure’ fantasy because of the satirical element. I’ve recently loved Sarah Addison Allen’s books for a touch of fantasy in a real world setting.

Any suggestions for Maudie, anyone? (Oh, and I suggest you take a look at Opal Moonbaby if you like children’s books or want a good read for a  7+ girl).

The next stop on the Opal Moonbaby tour is the magical Book Angel Booktopia. If you want to check out the other places Maudie’s visited, click on the tour button for a list. (I’d particularly recommend the Serendipity Reviews stop, where a fabulous tea party for Opal with fictional characters was planned)

Double Shadows Blog Tour: Can You Police the Past?

Today, Thoughts from the Hearthfire is visited by the lovely Sally Gardner. She’s here as part of her Double Shadows blog tour to promote the marvellous and myseterious-sounding The Double Shadow, released today. The hardcover looks gorgeous (with a lovely matte dust jacket – I’m such a book-stroker…) and I’m looking forward to reading this (it’s somehow jumped to the top of my TBR pile *whistles innocently*).

Anyway, over to Sally and her take on the idea of Political Correctness in writing historical fiction for children.

The past is a foreign country, and we did do things differently there. There is a tendency to whitewash it in fiction – especially for younger readers. This robs them of the knowledge of the journey we’ve made and the lessons we’ve learned. You can’t pat-a-cake the past pretty, you have to be true.

The Double Shadow is set between the wars and in the 1930s they smoked a lot, anti-Semitism was prevalent in Britain as well as Europe, there was the use of drugs and alcohol, the facts of life were not taught and young girls were often in trouble. Things were swept under the carpet and not talked about, but in the writing of them you bring them out from under the carpet.

Then, if you upset a man’s moral machinery by being dressed in a sparkling skirt you would expect little sympathy for what happened to you. The two world wars can’t be made to look all right, they were a huge black cloud over Europe and they changed the fabric of our society. Not to talk about it is a terrible mistake.

Humans on the whole are very slow learners as history has proved. The wheel always goes back a little before it goes forward. Writers have a duty to be true to what history has given them, even when writing fiction and especially when writing for a young audience. There is an issue with patronising today’s youth. The dumbing down of history should not be condoned.


Thank you so much to Sally for sharing such interesting thoughts with us today. I agree completely: part of the excitement of reading is discovering different viewpoints and we can’t do that if we re-colour and re-touch attitudes from past times (or from different places and cultures).



Don’t forget to visit the other stops on the tour!