Tag Archives: contemporary

UKYA Review: Mind The Gap by Phil Earle

Mind The Gap, Phil Earle, (Barrington Stoke, Jan 2017)

Genres in the mix: contemporary

Age target: YA

Story basicsWhen Mikey’s dad died, something in Mikey died too. He loved his old man and he never stopped dreaming that one day his dad would land the role of a lifetime, prove them all wrong, and rock back up to the estate in the flashiest car anyone had ever seen. Now there’s just numbness, and not caring, and really, really stupid decisions. He says the worst of it is that he can’t even remember his dad’s voice any more. Eventually Mikey’s best mate can’t bear it any more, and so he sets out to give Mikey the memories – and his dad’s voice – back.

Review-in-a-tweet:  Gripping and emotive tale of mates and choices. ‘Super-readable’, sharply contemporary, realistic; will strike a chord with many teens.

The emotional ride: Obviously, at times this is tough. Mikey’s pain over losing his Dad is clear, but it is generally quite understated. It’s more about the immediate problems of Mikey acting stupidly because he doesn’t care about things any more, and about his mate’s quest to find a way to give Mikey his dad’s voice once more.

Hot buttons/classroom opportunities: The biggest opportunity this book (and others from Barrington Stoke) offers teachers is the chance to get students reading for pleasure. It’s a genuine gift in that department.

At Yr 11 Parents’ Evening last week, I had this along with The Liar’s Handbook and Unboxed from Barrington Stoke, (and some other YA titles of various kinds) on my desk ready for the ‘but I don’t know what to read’ moment, and it was brilliant to be able to show them the fantastic package that these little books are to make them super-readable:

  • clear sans-serif font
  • tinted pages (one mum said ‘I have dyslexia and I can see those words – I couldn’t on the sheet of exam dates you just showed me’)
  • short chapters and overall book length
  • stories by authors already successful for this age group, not teachers or ‘dyslexia experts’
  • topics and themes found in other YA novels, nothing simplified in content, only in readability

Several students took photos of the books, to be able to buy them later/find them in a library – yay!

Main character: I’d say it’s impossible to read this and not be behind Mikey 100%, even when he’s being an idiot (and he really is, at times). Phil Earle makes you understand why he’s being an idiot, so you just feel for him even more (that’s part of the ‘not simplified content’ thing about these books – they require an emotional maturity, but the reading age is only 8. No mean feat!)

Hearthfire rating: 9/10 A scorcher!

Mind the Gap is out now in the UK from Barrington Stoke, who kindly provided me with a review copy.

Accepting a review copy does not affect my view of a book and I only finish and review books that I feel able to recommend.

I’m counting this review towards the British Books Challenge 2017: my third for the challenge.

UKYA review: Under Rose-Tainted Skies by Louise Gornall

Rose3Under Rose-Tainted Skies, Louise Gornall, (out now from Chicken House)

Genres in the mix: contemporary

Age target: YA

Story basics: Norah has agoraphobia and OCD and only leaves her house for therapy. She only experiences the outside world through her windows with pink panes (the rose glass alluded to in the fantastic title – love the pun on ‘tinted’ with its implications of staining -) and longs for normality. The arrival of new neighbours, especially Luke, who is her age and interacts with her, intensifies this longing.

Review-in-a-tweet: Fantastic portrayal of mental ill health with well-rounded and easy-to-care about characters on all sides.

The emotional ride: Not exactly smooth! But then, that is as it should be with a book with such themes. At the same time, I at no times felt annoyingly/clumsily manipulated as I have done when reading some other mental health-themed teen books. There is no glorification/romanticisation of Norah’s condition and, however the summary/blurb may lead you to think so, it’s no straightforward ‘romance saves the day’ plot, either – that would be an unjust simplification and Louise Gornall is too smart and honest for that.

Hot buttons/classroom opportunities: mental health issues – how they are handled in society, how they are/can be written about/presented in art/culture/media, why we shouldn’t equate OCD with liking tidiness etc (perfect opportunity to discuss/show the crippling nature of the actual condition).

Plotting and pacing: the beautifully lyrical style may be a little slow for impatient readers/those who prefer action-packed books, but I loved it and feel Gornall should be applauded for pulling off a novel set almost entirely in one house. There is a great attention to detail, which naturally fits with Norah’s narrative style and personality.

 

Hearthfire rating: 10/10 Smoking hot!

Under Rose-Tainted Skies is out now in the UK from Chicken House, who provided me with a review copy.

Accepting a review copy does not affect my view of a book and I only finish and review books that I feel able to recommend.

UKYA Review: Orangeboy by Patrice Lawrence

orangeboyOrangeboy, Patrice Lawrence, (Hodder, June 2016)

Genres in the mix: Contemporary realism

Age target: YA

Blurb saysNot cool enough, not clever enough, not street enough for anyone to notice me. I was the kid people looked straight through.

NOT ANY MORE. NOT SINCE MR ORANGE.

Sixteen-year-old Marlon has made his mum a promise – he’ll never follow his big brother, Andre, down the wrong path. So far, it’s been easy, but when a date ends in tragedy, Marlon finds himself hunted. They’re after the mysterious Mr Orange, and they’re going to use Marlon to get to him. Marlon’s out of choices – can he become the person he never wanted to be, to protect everyone he loves?

Review-in-a-tweet: Gripping, chilling and yet warm and gently told – this is a tale full of the poor (if somewhat inevitable) choices of a boy against whom the odds seem stacked from the first.

The emotional ride: edge-of-your-seat stuff. It’s easy to feel for Marlon from the beginning. I think having the first scene be what is so clearly a first date makes him so vulnerable that we readers easily identify with him and see what a fish out of water he is when everything starts getting serious.

Hot buttons/classroom opportunities: I’ll be recommending this for Black History month. Yes, I know it’s contemporary and very current and not at all historical, but there’s so much here about how young black people, boys especially, are treated and the expectations people have of them, that it seems really apt to me as a book about Black experience. I think that’s part of what Black History Month is about, so this goes firmly on my list.

Narrative style: The first person narration really helps to ‘get inside’ Marlon’s way of thinking, so it’s easy to understand why he does things, even when you can see (as an outsider) that he’s making the wrong choice.

Plotting and pacing: This is a strong aspect of the novel. It’s a pacey read, with plenty going on in poor Marlon’s life. There’s the whole ‘Mr Orange’ mystery, but there’s also plenty of conflict and mess in his family life too. I enjoyed the thread about his Dad, and the way this was linked in through music – I think that’s a key way a lot of people relate through the generations, which isn’t always noted, so it was nice to see it brought out here.

Hearthfire rating: 9/10 A scorcher!

Thank you to Hodder for allowing me a review copy via Netgalley. For more info on the book see Goodreads, Patrice Lawrence’s blog or Twitter or the publisher’s site.

The Reading Teacher: Two Extracts from Recent Teen Fiction to Teach Writing

I have written before about the tension between writing ‘rules’ taught in primary school and advice shared with those who seek publication. Today, I thought rather than rehash that rant, I’d offer something a bit more concrete. So, here are the openings of a couple of recent UKYA novels that classes could explore to discuss some ways in which good writing works.

With less time for ‘reading’ lessons in KS3 and none with older students, it’s a good way to be able to push books in front of them that they might be interested in reading. I’m always happy to make stealth UKYA recommendations to my classes, convinced that this is a much more likely way to gain an extra reader or two than only ever showing them the classics.

I’ve happily used these (and others) with classes from KS3 to A Level. The novels are marketed as Young Adult, but in practice will be read by about 12 to adult (I enjoy them, so I’m not putting an end age, OK?). I’ve chosen a contemporary story and an urban fantasy for today, as I would pair these together in a lesson in order to meet different tastes in reading (and to show that genre writing matters too).

Teaching Dialogue: Emma Hearts LA, Keris Stainton

Orchard Books, 2012

‘Most girls of your ageemma hearts la would jump at the chance to move to California,’ my mum says. She had been standing in front of the fireplace to make the big announcement, but, thanks to my reaction to it, she’s now sitting on the sagging sofa next to me.

I stare at her. ‘You are joking, right?’

‘No. No, I’m not joking,’ she says. ‘I’m sorry, Emma, but this is a great opportunity for me. And it’s a great opportunity for us as a family.’

I glance at my sister, who’s sunk deep in a beanbag in the corner of the room. She’s fiddling with her phone, a half-smile on her face.

‘Bex!’ I say. ‘You can’t be pleased about this! Tell me you’re not pleased about this!’

She glances up at me from under her floppy fringe. ‘I think it’ll be cool to live in Hollywood.’

‘Well, it won’t actually be Hollywood,’ Mum says.

‘Near enough,’ Bex says, grinning. She’s a drama dork, my sister. I bet she thinks she’ll be talent-spotted at the airport and have her own Disney XD show by the end of the year.

‘It’s a new start,’ Mum says.

This extract is brilliant for exploring pacing in dialogue and the technicalities of using dialogue in story writing. Here are a few of the things I’ve had different kinds of students do with this text:

  • Highlight/underline all the actual speech to look at how the author has spread it out, using commentary from the narrator to provide additional information and stretch out the tension.
  • Explore why authors rarely actually vary speech verbs (better to use said/says, which becomes invisible rather than ‘bogging down’ the text; speech can be attributed using other comments e.g. ‘I stare at her’, ‘She glances up…’ in this example).
  • Examine the tone and language of the speech to see how it has been made realistic, perhaps then asking students to rewrite or produce a dialogue-heavy piece of writing of their own.
  • Explore specific features of the dialogue and speech-like aspects of the narration:
    • grammatical: why contractions are mostly used but then not in ‘you are joking?’
    • grammatical: minor and incomplete sentences such as ‘near enough’ and
    • lexical: repetition, discourse markers and recycling/repetition.
  • Discuss the way dialogue and narration are used together to create a voice which speaks to the reader and firmly places us on Emma’s side (e.g. the suggestion of mum’s ‘staging’ of her announcement and the focus on Bex’s unrealistic expectations).

Teaching Atmospheric Writing: The Night Itself, Zoë Marriottthe night itself

Walker Books, 2013

Stealing the sword was a bad idea. I can’t pretend I didn’t realize that at the time. I wasn’t even supposed to know about the thing, let alone sneak up and snaffle it from the attic where it was carefully concealed in the dark, under layers of cobwebs and rotting Christmas decorations. I was fully aware that if my father found out about the sword or about me taking it, he’d pop a blood vessel from sheer fury and kill me. Or die. Maybe both.

If your family’s priceless heirloom is some ugly vase or painting, like on the Antiques Roadshow, the worst thing that can happen if you mess with it is that you’ll smash it or ruin the patina or something. My family’s antique is a different story. Sixty-two centimetres of curved, single-edged steel, designed with a single purpose: to kill. You’d probably call it a samurai sword. But its proper name is katana.

And I needed it for my Christmas party costume.

I’ve used this extract as an example of a strong opening, creating a sense of both character and of plot. Something exciting is clearly going to happen. Here are a few activities I’ve found useful with various student groups in exploring this text:
  • Highlight/underline the descriptive phrases to explore the balance of description and information. There are some effective descriptive details, but too much at this point would swamp the story and slow it down too much.
  • Printing the extract out with a space after every sentence for the students to write back. This could be a question to the narrator (what sword? why did you steal it?) or their own journal-type musings (hmm, I’m interested now). With some students, making it a live-tweeting-type activity has worked well, with a sentence at a time on a powerpoint and ‘tweets’ written on mini whiteboards to capture their reactions. This leads nicely into a discussion about how the author manages (manipulates is such a harsh word…) reader emotions and expectations, especially if you can save some of those ‘tweets’ for discussion at the end, once the whole has been seen.
  • Examining sentence and paragraph length. Students too often write very long sentences and very long paragraphs. I have made students count words, list the words in each sentence and paragraph and then edit a piece of their own work to these rules:
    • no single paragraph longer than the first paragraph here (in number of words)
    • no single sentence longer than the longest sentence here
    • only one ‘long’ sentences (calculated as mean of three longest sentences here) per paragraph
    • at least one very short sentence per paragraph
  • Discussing tone: highlight/underline parts that fall into these categories, in order to show how more impressive vocabulary is balanced with more colloquial language to avoid an overly distanced or alienating tone. The separation of the final sentence is also worth discussion in terms of its punchline-like effect. With older/more able students, I also discuss how the syntax creates a spoken feel, focusing on:
    • unusual high-register/’fancy’ words
    • unusual colloquial/’slangy’ words
    • sentences that ‘feel’ chatty/casual
  • Exploring how to set up a story without over-explaining. Students list what we learn from this extract about:
    • the narrator
    • her family
    • the plot
  • Examining how the motif of conflict is seeded in this opening, by pulling out all the contrasted ideas and words.

What do you think? If you enjoyed this/found it interesting/useful, please do let me know. I’d love to feature further ‘popular’ fiction extracts that I’ve used in class along with what I’ve done with them.

UKYA Review: Apple and Rain by Sarah Crossan

Every so often, one book will make you cross, make you cry and make you smile – and then you know it’s a winner. Apple and Rain is that book most recently for me. It’s an absorbing and emotional read which I simultaneously wanted to race through and linger over.

Here’s the Goodreads summary:

Apple and RainWhen Apple’s mother returns after eleven years of absence, Apple feels whole again. She will have an answer to her burning question – why did you go? And she will have someone who understands what it means to be a teenager – unlike Nana. But just like the stormy Christmas Eve when she left, her mother’s homecoming is bitter sweet, and Apple wonders who is really looking after whom. It’s only when Apple meets someone more lost than she is, that she begins to see things as they really are.

Like a brilliant hybrid of Cathy Cassidy and Jacqueline Wilson, Sarah Crossan entices you into her world, then tells a moving, perceptive and beautifully crafted story which has the power to make you laugh and cry.

and here’s my speed-review on finishing:

Really loved this. There’s so much of value here. Firstly and most importantly: it’s a great story, well-told (without that, nothing else matters all that much…). Secondly, some interesting representational issues: non-typical families, working class/money issues. Thirdly, some great bookishness: an inspiring English teacher (gotta love that!), the power of poetry as a theme, libraries as a tool. What’s not to love?

I loved the quirky characters and had so much sympathy for (most of) them throughout the book. There were times I shed the odd tear, times I wanted to tell Apple she was making a mistake – and I always think that’s a positive sign of being really invested in a book.

Definitely recommended to fans of UKYA contemporaries: this is a great example.

Actually, on revisiting those initial comments, I don’t have much to add. You all know I hate spoilers, and almost everything I would want to go into detail about would be one.  I will say that I suspect I read a different book as an adult to the one I might have found as a teenager (don’t you just love that about books?). I desperately wanted to hug Nana and slap Mum more than once (I’m pretty sure that’s no great spoiler) and I definitely loved the English teacher angle although I do feel that there isn’t time to be that kind of teacher now, so those kind of depictions are bitter-sweet for me…

Anyway, this is all getting a bit personal.

This book is fabulous and I would absolutely recommend it. I think comfy-cosy-safe YA readers will enjoy it and warm to Apple, and YA readers with less-than-perfect lives will also appreciate another good contemporary story that doesn’t focus only on the shiny happy kids – something that I think UKYA does particularly well. Sarah Crossan is a great writer and this is a beautifully written book, which presents some challenging ideas wonderfully well. Read it – it’s out now from Bloomsbury (and was nominated for the Carnegie and the UKLA awards, so it’s not just me who thinks it’s good).

Literary Lonely Hearts: are you a match for I’ll Give You The Sun?

I'll give you the sunLiterary Lonely Hearts

Soulful semi-mystic seeks fan of YA contemporaries for meaningful conversations about art, the many forms of love and the true self. Must be willing to invest emotionally and maybe shed the odd tear.

 

Goodreads’ Summary:

From the author of The Sky Is Every­where, a radiant novel that will leave you laughing and crying – all at once. For fans of John Green, Gayle Forman and Lauren Oliver. Jude and her twin Noah were incredibly close – until a tragedy drove them apart, and now they are barely speaking. Then Jude meets a cocky, broken, beautiful boy as well as a captivating new mentor, both of whom may just need her as much as she needs them. What the twins don’t realize is that each of them has only half the story and if they can just find their way back to one another, they have a chance to remake their world.

My reaction:

Gorgeous, lyrical writing which really suits the ‘arty’ subject matter. I loved getting to know this wacky family and their circle. The dual narrative works really well, with each twin getting to share a different slice of their story (Noah at 13-14, Jude at 16). This is a really effective way of increasing tension and mystery, as you can’t help wondering how they get from one (metaphorical/emotional) place to another. Wholeheartedly recommended for fans of contemporary YA, family dramas and stories with an arty angle. Also pleasingly diverse with different kinds of love (gay, straight, familial etc) all represented.

UKYA review: Remix by Non Pratt

RemixRemix is a fantastic UKYA novel, focusing on friendship. It made me realise how few YA novels centralise this theme, and also how peculiar this actually is, given the importance that friendship has in our teen years. I am recommending Remix for its realistic portrayal of contemporary teen life – realistic and ‘gritty’ (as they say) whilst also being warm and witty. Just like Trouble, Non Pratt’s debut YA novel, Remix has some stand-out hilarious moments and lines.

The emphasis on realism is a key strength. As you no doubt know, I love the fantasy genre. I’m a sucker for a teen with special powers, a chosen one, a mystifyingly wise teen who can be trusted with the fate of the world. I say all this, so no-one thinks I’m criticising fantasy per se. One of the best things about Non Pratt’s YA is the realism of her teen characters. The girls in Remix are not being plotted against by a vile, popular-girl bully – all of the messes they get into are of their own making. They are warts-n-all teens, let loose at a music festival to mess things up royally (I use this blog at school sometimes, so need to watch my language 😉 but I think you know what I mean…). This is how to ‘do’ realism.

The alternating perspectives of Ruby and Kaz work brilliantly to reveal all and make it impossible to take sides. So many times I was willing one or other of the girls to tell the other something, explain something or take some other choice. It was always easy to see why they did/said what they did/said, but we do get the benefit of both sides of the story, so it’s easy to see what ‘should’ be said or done.

I also really appreciate the firmly UK setting and language of Remix (and Trouble). Cool and contemporary without falling into the trap of cringe-inducing and rapidly-dating slang, Remix feels fresh and bang up to date. I’d strongly recommend reading this soon as a way of hanging onto the last of summer!

Remix is out now from Walker Books.

UKYA Review: Read Me Like a Book by Liz Kessler

Beautiful inside and out.
Beautiful inside and out.

I was really excited for this book and I am happy to say that not only was I not disappointed but blown away by its quiet brilliance.

Liz Kessler is an author I have enjoyed reading before and knowing how important this novel is to her I was desperate to read it for myself.

As you probably already know (but just in case…), this is an LGBT+ coming of age story, focused on Ashleigh’s developing realisation that she has romantic feelings for her teacher, Miss Murray. It’s a story that Liz wrote years ago and recently dusted off and updated. A story whose time had come. It is an important story, adding to the representation of LGBT+ experience within YA, but above all else, it is a compelling story, well told – and for that reason, I would urge you to pick it up.

Here is my initial reaction:

Loved this fabulous coming-of-age tale. For anyone wondering: the beauty of the cover is absolutely matched by the beauty of the story inside. This is a sensitively told close-up view of a teenaged girl figuring out both herself and the world around her. Read Me Like a Book will (quite rightly) be on lots of LGBT recommended reading lists, but the central quandaries about identity, family and friends will be familiar to most if not all teens and former teens. Strongly recommended.

The plot revolves around Ashleigh’s life in her second year of sixth form and there are various complications with school, friends and family for her to negotiate, all while attempting to understand and deal with her own feelings. This is, in the end, a coming out story par excellance as this crucial part of Ashleigh’s growing up is explored thoroughly and set against a backdrop of other complications (just as it is in real life!). This means that there is plenty for any YA reader to relate to, regardless of specific orientation and experience.

Liz’s tight narration immerses us in Ashleigh’s experiences and thoughts, even while as outsiders we can often perceive things that she is not able to at that point. That’s always a sign of great writing, I think – when you’re willing the character to do the sensible thing or see the truth of something, even knowing full well that stories don’t work like that! I loved Ashleigh and found her easy to relate to and engage with, and I enjoyed the portrayals of her friends and family too. I also enjoyed (and found it unusual) that Ashleigh doesn’t actually realise herself that she is a lesbian initially, but just assumes she’s straight and has a relationship with a boy. I think this initial struggle with the very idea, and the uncertainty of your own sense of identity shifting are very well captured and add to the reader’s engagement with Ashleigh.

I would wholeheartedly recommend this beautiful book to readers of YA contemporaries, especially if you’re keen for a UK context.

Read Me Like a Book is out now from Indigo.

Speed Reviews: Recent UKMG Contemporary Recommendations

Today, I’m sharing two recent contemporaries for the MG audience which both have male protagonists, are set on/around UK housing estates and have friends and family as themes. However, they are different in tone and will appeal to different ends of the MG age spectrum.

how to fly with broken wingsJane Elson’s How to Fly With Broken Wings is the story of 12 year old Willem, who has Asperger’s Syndrome (although I don’t think this is stated explicitly in the story). He is given a homework project to make two friends and this is the catalyst for the story, which becomes very big and quite complex, taking in bullying, gangs, teen relationships, a riot on the estate and a local hero who works to empower the estate kids and keep them out of trouble. With all that going on, the story is relatively far-fetched at times in that rosy, improbable, somewhat heavy on coincidence way that children’s lit can get away with, and that’s one of the reasons that this book feels younger to me than my other recommendation here.

Willem is an engaging character and swapping the narration between him and Sasha, a school mate who lives on his estate, is a great way of opening up the story and showing Willem from other perspectives. It’s easy to see from the outside how Willem’s views on everything don’t necessarily fit with everyone else’s and understanding his thought processes makes him even easier to root for. All in all, I’d recommend this for the average MG reader who’s looking for a bright contemporary story about friendship and identity.

Joe All AloneJoanna Nadin’s Joe All Alone focuses on 13 year old Joe, whose mother goes away on holiday for a week with her boyfriend (of whom Joe is not a fan), leaving him to look after himself. Grittier from the start than Elson’s book, this brilliantly executed story explores poverty, neglect and the complexities of family life.

I loved Joe and really got engaged in his adventures, willing him on and hoping for things to work out for him. The book introduces a range of vivid and interesting characters and something that I really admired about it was the way it successfully combines realism and hope. With a 13 year old protagonist, the book is clearly aimed at the MG set and I think it offers this age group the perfect blend of (at times) hard realism and hope in friendship and humanity generally. Painful at times but a rewarding and enjoyable read, I’m absolutely recommending this, particularly to those readers who often find themselves between the 9-12 and teen/YA shelves.

How to Fly with Broken Wings is out now from Hodder Children’s Books; Joe All Alone is out now from Hachette. I am grateful to have received review copies via NetGalley.

March’s Reading Log

It’s time for the monthly round-up! These posts help keep track of the reading challenges I’m doing this year and also give a quick shout-out for all the books I’ve been reading (not just those I review).

I won’t give too much detail here (as this kind of post gets long really quickly) – just a quick summary of each book read and some stats. The book titles link to their Goodreads pages for more info.

Mar reads

The Sin Eater’s DaughterMelinda Salisbury, Scholastic, 2015, YA fantasy

Loved this well-crafted fantasy focusing on Twylla, taken from her family as the incarnation of the Gods’ daughter, Daunen Embodied. She can kill by touch with the poison that seeps out of her skin, yet miraculously leaves her unharmed. A great start to a new trilogy, with a satisfying conclusion to this phase of the story.

Crow Moon, Anna McKerrow, Quercus, 2015, YA fantasy

A brilliant read that I lapped up quickly and now have to wait a year for the sequel to. Set in the Greenworld, a pagan haven version of contemporary Cornwall and Devon, the novel focuses on a crisis for protagonist Danny, never really much of a believer in the pagan ways. Another trilogy-opener which concludes the initial story well. Definitely recommended for fantasy and/or dystopia fans.

Starring Kitty, Keris Stainton, Catnip, 2014, MG contemporary

Gorgeous MG/younger YA romance focusing on Kitty’s difficulties balancing friendship and first (same-sex) love against the backdrop of a film competition. This is the first in a series, each of which will focus on a different friend in the group – a great concept for exploring the contemporary world in detail. It’s also a brilliantly-executed example of how to ‘do’ diversity with great, relatable stories. Spotlight on Sunny, the second in the series is also out now and once my youngest has finished with it, I’ll be grabbing that too!

Jessica’s Ghost, Andrew Norriss, David Fickling, 2015, MG contemporary

This book really surprised me. Billed as a MG  ‘friendship’ novel, it tackles mental health issues and raises the idea of suicide without alienating or frightening the target age group. I’ll be astonished if this isn’t on prize shortlists next year but please don’t be put off by the ‘worthiness’ I’m implying here.  most importantly, I really enjoyed it – it’s a great read.

Marly’s Ghost, David Levithan, Egmont, 2015, YA contemporary

This Valentine-themed reworking of Dickens’ A Christmas Carol makes a fabulous read. I loved the fidelity to the original in many small details, rendered with a hefty dose of creativity and originality. My reading of it was definitely enhanced by knowledge of the Dickens, but I’m sure it would still be a greatly satisfying contemporary read without that.

How to Fly with Broken Wings, Jane Elmore, Hodder Children’s, 2015, MG contemporary

I greatly enjoyed this gentle contemporary about finding out who you are and what matters, set on a London housing estate during a series of riots. Dual narration from the points of view of Willem, who has Asperger’s Syndrome, and Sasha, whose boyfriend bullies Willem. Definitely recommended for around 9+.

The Testimony of the Hanged Man, Ann Granger, Headline, 2015, adult crime

This is the fifth in the series, but the first I’d read. I had no trouble following it and am definitely interested in reading more in the series. It’s great to read a Victorian London-set mystery with dual narration from the Police Inspector MC and also his wife, who does her own investigation. A relatively gentle crime and a mystery to enjoy.

Nightbird, Alice Hoffman, Simon & Schuster, 2015, MG fantasy

I’d loved other Hoffman novels (for adults) which I’d read and found this both really true to form – focused on families, identities within families, and magic – and beautifully rendered for the younger age group. A great read for 9+ fans of contemporary stories with a touch of magic.

Bomb, Sarah Mussi, Hodder Children’s, 2015, YA thriller

I enjoyed this pacey thriller with relentless danger and breathless narrative style. It’s absolutely recognisably Sarah Mussi – if you liked Siege and/or Riot, you’ll like this too. If you haven’t tried her before, read her for a high action, high stakes political thriller.

True Face, Siobhan Curham, 2015, Faber and Faber, YA self-help

I haven’t read a self-help book for teens before but am thoroughly impressed with this one. Focused on living an authentic life and ignoring unhelpful and potentially damaging media messages, this book leads teen readers through a series of exercises to rediscover their own interests and feelings, and to bring their own desires to the forefront of their lives. I’m definitely recommending this empowering read to girls of 13+.

Challenges Progress this month – books read:

UKYA/UKMG titles: The Sin Eater’s Daughter, Crow Moon, Starring Kitty, Jessica’s Ghost, How to Fly with Broken Wings, Bomb

own book: The Sin Eater’s Daughter, Crow Moon, Starring Kitty

TBR-escapee: Testimony of the Hanged Man

Reviews published this month:

Full reviews: The Sky Is Everywhere, Jessica’s Ghost

eligible for British Books Challenge: Jessica’s Ghost

eligible for Dive Into Diversity ChallengeJessica’s Ghost (representation of mental health)

Plans for next month

To review more! March has been very busy for me and, although I’ve managed to tuck away a good few reads, this hasn’t translated into many reviews – yet. This is something I definitely plan to remedy in April.