Tag Archives: gothic

The Reading Teacher: Recommendations to Share

Welcome to a new blog feature. I’ve been making recommendations over on Twitter for a while, with a particular eye on teachers’ needs, using the hashtag #ReadingTeacher and I thought I’d share a few here with a bit more detail (and some resources to share with students!). I’ve already blogged about this idea in general terms, so I’ll just cut straight to recommending some books, if that’s ok 🙂 Here are some I’ll be recommending to my classes over the next couple of weeks:

Download Lemony Snicket slide    Download Narrative Voice slide

I don’t know about you, but my resident teens and I have become big fans of the Netflix version of ‘A Series of Unfortunate Events’, so I thought that making some recommendations based on that might be prudent. I’ve gone for a gothic vibe largely, general weirdness and a dark comic tone as you can see from the info on the slide. I first read Good Omens in sixth form and it was certainly accessible (although I think there were references I only understood on re-reading as an adult), so I’m hopeful some bright yr11s might like it. Incidentally, there will be a Good Omens series (penned by Gaiman) on Amazon and the BBC in 2018.

As for my ‘narrative voice’ collection, I thought it would be nice to cluster books by literary feature sometimes rather than theme, as it allows for a broader spread of content and gives me more chance to offer something to catch the interest of more students in a class.

As with all my recommendations, I’ve personally read most of these, or can vouch for their quality based on the word of others (confession: I haven’t read Miss Peregrine – yet – but many of my go-to trusted bloggers have). The main aim of my recommendations is to encourage reading for pleasure, but I am doing so through well-written texts which are worthy of students’ time. If they read these, they will be exposed to decent vocabulary used appositely, well-balanced sentences, maybe some use of literary features such as metaphor, all while being able to access and enjoying a good story.

Guest Post from Emma Carroll, author of Strange Star: Why Gothic Fiction Is Still Relevant Today

Today I’m very pleased to welcome Emma Carroll to the Hearthfire. She’s here for the last stop on her blog tour for the fabulously gothic middle grade novel Strange Star, inspired by Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein and highly recommended.

It could be the blurb for a YA novel: a group of friends on holiday, a thunderstorm, a night in with drinks, ghost stories, the simmering tension of who fancies who.

It also describes one of the most famous gatherings in literary history. When Mary Shelley (then Godwin) stayed at the Villa Diodati with Lord Byron and Percy Shelley in June 1816, the idea for ‘Frankenstein’ was conceived- that’s one theory, anyway. There are many others- she was inspired by her mother’s death, the loss of her own daughter, a dream where she brought her dead baby back to life, the frustration of being fiercely intelligent in a male-dominated world, jealousy. Such a rich mix of ‘possibles’ only adds to her allure.

As part of the Stoke Newington Festival in June, I did a panel event to mark the 200-year anniversary of that portentous night in 1816. Though there wasn’t a thunderstorm, the venue- a beautiful Elizabethan church- was suitably gothic. Grass grew waist- deep in the graveyard outside. Inside, was all black beams and carved wood seats and walls pock-marked with age. There were no lights, only candles. It was perfect.

The panel -Sally Gardner (Tinder, The Door That Led To Where), Eleanor Wassenburg (Foxlowe), Karen Lee Street (Edgar Allan Poe and the London Monster), and I- were writers whose work is gothic-influenced.  Sarah Perry (The Essex Serpent) was also meant to join us, but sadly was sick. (cue: gothic ‘thwarted dreams’ moment as my fangirling hopes were dashed!) Chaired by journalist, critic and unabashed ‘Frankenstein’ fan Suzy Feay, we discussed Shelley’s inspirations and how the gothic still shapes writing today.

And is it still a relevant genre, we pondered? Was it not all red drapes and swooning ladies in nightgowns? Had the gothic not become pastiche?

No, in short.

Any genre that gives voice to a minority will always have a place. In many ways the gothic is a code, a language, a metaphor if you will, for what it is to be vulnerable. Writers like Angela Carter recognised its overtly feminist, post-modern narrative. Monsters aren’t always truly evil; victims aren’t always weak. There are challenges, desires, emotions- all of which feel, on first reading, to be familiar story tropes, yet on closer consideration speak of anguish in a way that might otherwise not be heard.

For me, Shelley’s masterpiece does exactly this. Who the true monster is, isn’t quite clear. Many critics say the disfigured creation rejected by its ‘father’ represents Shelley herself. Her appearance was the means by which others judged her, so much so that ‘Frankenstein’ was initially published under Percy Shelley’s name. She took inspiration from the growing Abolition movement. She was aware of the limitations imposed by race and gender. Her relationship with her father was strained, cool, her marriage troubled by jealousies. She craved acceptance and belonging, just as her monster does.

Shelley’s use of gothic allows her to speak at a time in history when society wasn’t listening. Two hundred years on, we still judge by colour and gender. In these post-Brexit times, we’re nervous of outsiders, people who don’t quite ‘fit’.

Gothic fiction gives dissenters a voice.

Emma is a former English teacher whose middle grade novels either fall into the historical genre or have a strong link to the past. She’s written about circuses, fairies and ghosts and all focus on children having a difficult time. She is published by Faber & Faber in the UK.

Top Five Between the Devil and the Deep Blue Sea Essentials: Blog Tour Post from April Tucholke

devil blog tour banner

Today we are fortunate to be one of the stops on April Tucholke’s blog tour celebrating the publication of Between the Devil and the Deep Blue Sea (see previous post for review, but short version: it’s a cracker). I’ve been enjoying these list-themed posts. Check out the banner opposite to see where to go if you’ve missed any. And over to April…

1. Coffee.

The characters down espresso every chance they get, especially River and Neely. They run on the stuff. If you don’t have a caffeine addiction before you start reading, you will afterward. Hopefully.

 

2. Classic film.

The first day River arrives in town he and Violet pack a picnic dinner and watch Casablanca at an outside showing in the town square. Neely and Violet see A Brief Encounter together, and “Citizen Kane” is the name of Violet’s rundown mansion by the sea.

 

3. Classic books and short stories.

I reference several in Between the Devil and the Deep Blue Sea. Jane Eyre, Wuthering Heights, The Shining, “A Rose for Emily.” Violet is reading “Young Goodman Brown” from Nathaniel Hawthorne’s Mosses from an Old Manse when she sees River for the first time.

Violet is a Bookworm Heroine. She doesn’t have magical fighting skills. She doesn’t know how to use a sword. She’s not a secret assassin. She doesn’t have a temper or a cabinet of lethal poisons (unfortunately). She reads books and thinks a lot and dreams a lot and still manages to save the day in the end.

 

4. Art.

Violet’s parents are artists and she and her twin brother grew up breathing art and paint. Degas, Chagall, Pollock, French Impressionism, Italian Renaissance… There is a small painting studio in the backyard that the characters spend time in.

 

5. Music.

The characters listen to old Robert Johnson records in the attic. A lot.

Thank you, April, for sharing those with us. If this has whetted your appetite for Devil and the Deep Blue Sea, it’s out now from Faber so no need to wait!

Review: Between the Devil and the Deep Blue Sea by April Tucholke

Between the Devil and the Deep Blue SeaFaded Gatsby glamour and thrilling gothic horror meet in this gorgeously told, terrifying and dreamy YA romance.

You stop fearing the devil when you’re holding his hand…

Nothing much exciting rolls through Violet White’s sleepy, seaside town…until River West comes along. River rents the guesthouse behind Violet’s crumbling estate, and as eerie, grim things start to happen, Violet begins to wonder about the boy living in her backyard. Is River just a crooked-smiling liar with pretty eyes and a mysterious past? Violet’s grandmother always warned her about the Devil, but she never said he could be a dark-haired boy who likes coffee and who kisses you in a cemetery… Violet’s already so knee-deep in love, she can’t see straight. And that’s just how River likes it.

I found this Gothic ‘old south’ novel deliciously creepy and, at times, outright scary. There are plot twists that I absolutely did not see coming and I enjoyed the many key Gothic ingredients. I enjoyed the ‘out of time’ feeling April Tucholke created, while at the same time making the location completely specific and easily imagined. It reminded me of other stuff I’ve read that harks back to the South’s heydays like Tennessee Williams. This is a skilful debut weaving Gothic elements with a lightness of touch.

The characterisation in the novel is convincing and it is easy to root for Violet. River I found I was more ambivalent about (perfectly correct for a good Gothic). The few other fleshed-out characters were also compelling, while the tight focus on Vi and her conflicted emotions contributes to the novel’s emotional intensity.

Another Gothic trope that is well executed here is the setting and more specifically the big old house that becomes practically a character. In this case, it is known as Citizen, Vi’s crumbling ancestral home. I enjoyed the visceral descriptions that really brought it to life and made it easy to see Vi’s deep connection to it.

Overall I really enjoyed this and would definitely recommend it to YA readers who enjoy the Gothic and/or beautiful writing with a generous helping of creepiness.

Out on 3rd April from Faber and Faber. My grateful thanks to the publisher for providing a review copy.