Reading Recommendations Slide 20: Friendship

These books all share fabulous representation of friendships – whether those friendships pre-exist before the story or are formed through the story.

I pop these recommendation slides up while I take KS4 and 5 registers (if I had yr9 classes, I’d use them there too) and allow students to read the info and decide whether they want to find any of these books. It’s a key one of my attempts to widen their reading and help them find books they might enjoy as there are certainly plenty of those out there, and the curriculum doesn’t always make it easy for us to present students with a pleasurable reading experience.

Download the slide here: Friendship

The last theme posted was genre-twisting/unusual reads. I make some links thematic, some topical, some more English-y. Please do let me know if you have ideas/suggestions/requests for future possible links.

Reading Recommendations Slide 19: Genre Busters/Something Different 2

These two are great reads and both defy genre descriptions in different ways. I’ve included a bit more description of the actual plot/book on the slide than normal, to try to pique students’ interest.

More of Me reads a lot of the time like a Contemporary YA, with concerns about friends and family, but has a weird Sci-Fi twist with this dividing-self thing and a strong dash of Mystery as Teva is trying to figure out what on earth is happening to her and how she can live the most normal life possible.

Midwinterblood is a sweeping, epic tale that takes in seven lifetimes crossing from pre-Christian times into the future, so spans from an Epic or High Fantasy setting into a Sci-Fi world, all the time with this link in that the characters are the same souls in different people, linked in different ways, so there’s Romance or even Saga in there too, plus some creepy Supernatural vibes.

Both are brilliant, and somewhat experimental in their own ways, and fab for students who don’t like anything that fits the normal genre boxes, whether they’ve torn through everything already, or won’t try anything because it sounds boring…

I pop these recommendation slides up while I take KS4 and 5 registers (if I had yr9 classes, I’d use them there too) and allow students to read the info and decide whether they want to find any of these books. It’s a key one of my attempts to widen their reading and help them find books they might enjoy as there are certainly plenty of those out there, and the curriculum doesn’t always make it easy for us to present students with a pleasurable reading experience.

Download the slide here: 5 – Genre-twisting and unusual reads

The last theme posted was for LGBT History Month. I make some links thematic, some topical, some more English-y. Please do let me know if you have ideas/suggestions/requests for future possible links.

Reading Recommendations Slide 18: for LGBT History Month

These five books are all good reads to explore during February, which is LGBT History Month, as they all offer great representation for a range of sexualities and gender identities. The slide shows which identity is particularly highlighted in each book, to help student selection. There is also a plug for @QueerYA on Twitter, who recommend a range of great LGBT-friendly books and will point to other relevant accounts, helping students to find a way in.

I pop these recommendation slides up while I take KS4 and 5 registers (if I had yr9 classes, I’d use them there too) and allow students to read the info and decide whether they want to find any of these books. It’s a key one of my attempts to widen their reading and help them find books they might enjoy as there are certainly plenty of those out there, and the curriculum doesn’t always make it easy for us to present students with a pleasurable reading experience.

Download the slide here: 4 – LGBT History Month

The last theme posted was film and photography (creatively-minded characters). I make some links thematic, some topical, some more English-y. Please do let me know if you have ideas/suggestions/requests for future possible links.

Recommendations: Writing/Poetry as a hobby in YA

To go with the creativity buzzzing through this week’s reading recs on the slide, here are three great titles that feature characters who enjoy writing as a pastime in YA novels:

Haunt Me, Liz Kessler

In this beautifully-written dual-narrative romance, writing is a key thing joining the two together. Joe wakes up to find his family moving out and no-one can see or hear him… Then another family moves in and gradually Erin discovers Joe’s presence.

A highly unusual premise, which works really well and has Liz Kessler’s trademark love of the sea evident.

Apple and Rain, Sarah Crossan

This beautiful family drama features a teacher who introduces Apple to writing and to poetry in particular as a way of helping her deal with the messiness of her life and her emotions. Poor Apple has to cope with a somewhat chaotic home life due to the actions of her mother – she left her with Nana eleven years ago, to pursue an acting career. Now she’s back, Apple thinks everything will be better, as Mum’s a lot more fun that strict old Nana.

The Sky Is Everywhere, Jandy Nelson

In this lyrical, poetic book, main character Lennie can barely contain her urge to write, scribbling on napkins and scraps of paper. This may have been the first YA novel in which I read teen poetry that felt fresh and plausible as teen, and yet didn’t make me cringe (but then the author is a poet as well as a novelist…). In the story, writing is used as emotional expression and therapy and exists already for Lennie before the story begins – it’s a clear part of her identity. The main thrust of the story is Lennie’s rebuilding of her life after her sister’s death – a plot which I personally found very realistically handled, as Lennie has ups and downs and also does other things (including considering romance) and has guilt about doing other things. It’s emotionally complex and messy, just as grief actually is.

Reading Recommendations Slide 17: Film and Photography as Hobbies

Back to a thematic link for this week, although this is not so much the central theme as a thread that appears in all of these stories via characters’ hobbies/ work/ career goals that enables readers with similar interests to relate.

I pop these recommendation slides up while I take KS4 and 5 registers (if I had yr9 classes, I’d use them there too) and allow students to read the info and decide whether they want to find any of these books. It’s a key one of my attempts to widen their reading and help them find books they might enjoy as there are certainly plenty of those out there, and the curriculum doesn’t always make it easy for us to present students with a pleasurable reading experience.

Download the slide here: 3 – Film and Photography

The last theme posted was for fans of DC and/or Marvel. I make some links thematic, some topical, some more English-y. Please do let me know if you have ideas/suggestions/requests for future possible links.

Asking For It: Review and A Level Language NEA Original Writing Practice Task (Book of the Month in depth)

Age range: upper YA (14+)

Themes: justice, gender, rape culture, social media

Genre: contemporary

Narrative style: first-person present tense; structurally separated into ‘last year’ and ‘this year’ (although all is expressed in present tense)

This is a punchily-written contemporary novel which explores the lead up to and aftermath of a gang rape of a teen girl at a party. Reviews all describe it using words like ‘unflinching’ and ‘brave’ and it has won and been nominated for a slew of awards, because it is an important book, published just before the recent stream of scandals that have hit Hollywood and caused people to discuss sexual behaviour again. This book is the perfect way to bring about that discussion with teens, as it is a great story which is not at all ‘preachy’, but alarmingly realistic in its presentation of people’s ‘shades of grey’ reactions.

I personally think it’s a stroke of genius that the main character is a ‘queen bee’ type and very definitely written to be unlikable – and yet once the rape has happened, I am firmly on her side. The pacing and use of point of view, particularly since Emma does not remember the event itself and must piece it together from things other tell her (and social media), are especially strong factors in the book’s crafting. It’s an absolute masterclass in addressing social issues through fiction, and that’s why the teaching activity for this post is a writing-based one.

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Here is a set of prompts for analysis on the first five pages, which are shared on the Irish Times website (but, again, I would also recommend buying a copy for your classroom/school library/self). I intend this as a practice task for working with a style model for the Original Writing part of the English Language NEA. Obviously, this extract is longer than students are permitted to write, but it helps them to get into the language and content of the text more if they can see a little more of it.

  • Which tense is used (and why)?
  • How does O’Neill create a picture of Emma’s mother as unreasonable?
    • find some relevant quotations and then identify the linguistic features used to craft this impression. How is this constructed?
  • How is dialogue presented?
    • Look at all the examples of dialogue and identify the tags/quotatives (speech verbs) used. Why is it done this way?
  • Examine the longer paragraph (‘The door closes behind her… jerking her head at me.’ p.6-7).
    • Why is this set of ideas presented in this way? What is the purpose of this block of text? How is this section different from the rest – in content and in style (features)?
  • What other features of this extract do you find interesting/effective in setting up this novel?

Use what you’ve observed to write your own YA novel opening in which you set up the characters and setting, making sure to similarly make the social context clear: family, social status, pressures on the character etc.

 

Reading Recommendations Slide 16: For Marvel/DC Fans

A selection of comic-book/superhero-themed titles for this week’s recommendation slide, and since last week I offered stretch titles, this week I’ve got a couple of easy-reads/younger titles (Electrigirl and My Brother Is a Superhero). Both of these are books I’ve recommended to lower-attaining KS4 students before, although they’re intended more as upper KS2-lower KS3 reads.

I pop these recommendation slides up while I take KS4 and 5 registers (if I had yr9 classes, I’d use them there too) and allow students to read the info and decide whether they want to find any of these books. It’s a key one of my attempts to widen their reading and help them find books they might enjoy as there are certainly plenty of those out there, and the curriculum doesn’t always make it easy for us to present students with a pleasurable reading experience.

Download the slide here: 2 – For Marvel and DC Fans

The last theme posted was Romance. I make some links thematic, some topical, some more English-y. Please do let me know if you have ideas/suggestions/requests for future possible links.

Reading Recommendations Slide 15: Romance

A selection of romantic titles for this week’s recommendation slide, including one with LGBT characters and some classics offered as stretch suggestions (Pride and Prejudice and Wuthering Heights).

I pop these recommendation slides up while I take KS4 and 5 registers (if I had yr9 classes, I’d use them there too) and allow students to read the info and decide whether they want to find any of these books. It’s a key one of my attempts to widen their reading and help them find books they might enjoy as there are certainly plenty of those out there, and the curriculum doesn’t always make it easy for us to present students with a pleasurable reading experience.

Download the slide here: 1 – Romance

I only post these up in term time, so the last theme posted was in December and it was novels with a particularly interesting/effective Narrative Voice. I make some links thematic, some topical, some more English-y. Please do let me know if you have ideas/suggestions/requests for future possible links.

Recommendations: Witches in YA

There’s something about dark, chilly nights and great witchy titles that just go together well, so I thought I’d share a few recommendations for some good ones for YA readers across a few genres.

A Witch In Winter, Ruth Warburton

This kicks off a contemporary-set trilogy (all of which are now out) which starts off ultra-modern with typical high-school, new-girl issues and quickly heads into beloved fantasy tropes with warring witch clans and centuries-old battles over power. The story kicks off with kids playing around with spells and the main character casts a love spell which works dramatically well, showing that she has power which she was previously unaware of. Fab, pacey writing with a keen ear for dialogue from the author who also writes adult thrillers as Ruth Ware (In a Dark, Dark Wood and The Woman in Cabin 10).

The Graces, Laure Eve

Another contemporary-set novel (with a sequel, The Curses, coming out in 2018), based heavily around high school. Inspired by the film The Craft, this book focuses on the Grace family and the town’s legends about their being witches, which inspire a new arrival to be obsessed with them. Teen readers will lap up the creepy vibes and good sense of school hierarchies and politics.

 

 

Crow Moon, Anna McKerrow

Near-future dystopian set in an England that’s been split by ecological disaster, this novel kicks off a trilogy (of which the last was released recently). In this version of the world, Devon and Cornwall form the Greenworld, an eco-pagan, self-sufficient community separated from the rest of the world (the Redworld), where resources are scarce. Magic and mystery rule as young Danny comes into his witch powers in a world ruled by women. The trilogy is a great read, with each novel focusing on and narrated by a different young witch.

Witchstruck, Victoria Lamb

Start of a historical trilogy about a witch set in Tudor times, with royalty and a witchfinder thrown in for good measure. The young witch, Meg Lytton, is also charged with looking after the imprisoned Lady Elizabeth at her half-sister, Queen Mary’s request.  She also has to hide her powers. These are pacey reads with plenty of historical detail and a good deal of intrigue, romance and suspense.

 

How To Hang a Witch, Adriana Mather

Contemporary-set high school paranormal drama with historical resonance. A new kid in school scenario, only this one is  set in Salem, and the new kid finds herself instantly unpopular simply because of her family name and its meaning in relation to the seventeenth-century witch trials (but yes, this is set in the 21st century!). The author makes interesting links between historical witch hunts and modern-day bullying in this novel packed with ghosts, witches, high school politics and a dash of romance.

Reading Recommendations Slide 14: Narrative Voice

A selection of books which all feature particularly effective narrative voice for this week: two thrillers and two contemporaries with different tones – both about family but in different ways. All are great reads, and all offer strong voices as part of that experience.

I pop these recommendation slides up while I take KS4 and 5 registers (if I had yr9 classes, I’d use them there too) and allow students to read the info and decide whether they want to find any of these books. It’s a key one of my attempts to widen their reading and help them find books they might enjoy as there are certainly plenty of those out there, and the curriculum doesn’t always make it easy for us to present students with a pleasurable reading experience.

Download the slide here: 8 – Strong voice

Last week’s theme was Christmas. I make some links thematic, some topical, some more English-y. Please do let me know if you have ideas/suggestions/requests for future possible links.