Reading Recommendations Slide 7: Multiple Narrative Voice

Most of these have more than two narrators, and there’s a good spread of genres too, with a twin-perspective romance, a family drama (with an incredible array of narrators that somehow is not confusing) and two thrillers – one action-focused and one more of a whodunnit. All demonstrate great character-building through voice.

I pop these recommendation slides up while I take KS4 and 5 registers (if I had yr9 classes, I’d use them there too) and allow students to read the info and decide whether they want to find any of these books. It’s a key one of my attempts to widen their reading and help them find books they might enjoy as there are certainly plenty of those out there, and the curriculum doesn’t always make it easy for us to present students with a pleasurable reading experience.

Download the slide here:  1 – Multiple narrators

 

Last week’s theme was contemporaries, coded for students as ‘for fans of series like Gilmore Girls and/or Riverdale). I make some links thematic, some topical, some more English-y. Please do let me know if you have ideas/suggestions/requests for future possible links.

Recommendations for Teachers for Downtime

With half-term on the horizon, I thought it might be timely to share a few recent adult books for a bit of escapist joy of our own. These cover a range of genres, so hopefully there’s something here that will appeal no matter your reading tastes.

Contemporary UK-set Urban Crime (Police Procedural)

Someone Else's Skin (DI Marnie Rome 1)Someone Else’s Skin, Sarah Hilary. OK, this is not so recent (2014), but that’s only because I have to recommend the first in this excellent series (we’re up to the fourth now). These books follow the career of DI Marnie Rome and her DS Noah Jake. I love them because they’re brilliantly written, totally absorbing and the representation they offer is a breath of fresh air in terms of diversity. To be fair, that is something found more in UK than US procedurals (hat-tip to Val McDermid, for example), but these are strong examples of something very ‘now’, very British and very moral. Hilary always raises an issue in her Marnie Rome books – I’ve always learned something, and always been gripped by the story. Her narration features the odd chapter from the perpetrator’s perspective (without giving away their identity), which intensifies the action. Beautifully done, and well worth a look. [Teacher hat on: also worth showing to students if you’re doing the Crime incarnation of the AQA Lit A Level. Sorry, couldn’t help myself…]

1980s US-set Nostalgia/Coming-of-age

The Impossible Fortress, Jason Rekulak. This book is about 14 year olds in 1987, which made me almost the same age as the protags at the same time, so the heavy references in the first couple of chapters to anchor the text were an amazing memory blast personally. The book is chock-full of early computer gaming and coding (with tapes!!), teen boy obsessions (Playboy, for example) and terrible ideas (because teen boys) and I should probably warn potential readers that the early part of it felt really ‘blokey’ to me but it’s much more intelligent and sensitive than it initially presents itself to be. It’s a well-done coming-of-age set firmly in a specific time-frame which I enjoyed a lot and would definitely recommend for its 80s nostalgia and its exploration of masculinity and growing up.

Romantic Comedy (with a splash of magic realism)

If You Could See Me Now, Keris Stainton. This hilarious novel features Izzy whose life is not quite what she’d wish for and whose boyfriend rather takes her for granted. And then something rather unexpected (and magical) happens and she’s forced to re-examine everything. I really enjoyed this – the characterisation is warm and easy to accept, and the crazy magic twist works in context. I found myself laughing often, with too many oh-so-familiar small details. I’ve always enjoyed Keris’s YA and children’s titles in the past – this is her first book for adults, but her trademark warmth and wit and keen ear for dialogue make it just as successful.

Black Comedy/Thriller (from serial killer’s perspective)

Sweetpea, C J Skuse. This irreverent and hilarious novel had me trying desperately not to laugh out loud on the bus, which is not what you expect from a serial killer novel, but the voice is superb. Rhiannon narrates and also shares snippets from her diary, often lists of people (or types of people) who annoy her – some of which you can easily understand and others are way beyond reasonable. The portrayal of her psychopathy is fab because you are happily nodding along with her complaints about other people and then suddenly it takes a turn and is all way too much. I should probably mention that there is quite a strong level of violence (and sex, for that matter) in this novel, and the language is also very much adult.

Folklore/Fairytale Retelling

A Pocketful of Crows, Joanne Harris (publishing 19 Oct). This is a treat of a book. Based on a Child ballad and featuring gorgeous line illustrations, it’s a feast of love, betrayal and revenge. I enjoyed getting lost in this and felt that it was something that Angela Carter would have taken real pleasure in – a delightful textural weaving of elements out of a relatively short original piece.

What will you pick up over half term?